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millions of other families that, what's wrong with mom? it was not the education about alcoholism and drug dependency that there is now. it took dad -- dad searched through several doctors before finding a doctor that had the courage to say your wife's an alcoholic. that was not just the image anybody accepted. found the right doctor, dad -- excuse me -- had the courage to say we're going to do this intervention, the whole family went in, did the intervention with mom, and, you know, at that time, i never heard the word "intervention," and now you got tv shows that do it. it was a different time. we did it. dad led the intervention, and my memory of that is very clear. he walked in the door that morning, all the kids, dad, surprised mom, took her hand and said, betty, we're here because we love you, the kids want their mother back, i want my wife back, and those interventions are tough. i mean, that is tough, hard, hard, hard work. a lot of tears. a lot of crying. a lot of raised voices. a lot of hugs, more raised voices, denial, and not denial, and i mean, it goes back and forth. it's a t
done a study for the department of education and submitted a report which was lost somewhere in the department of education. later, u.s. news and world report tried to track it down. wasn't able to do it. professor judith kleinfilled called and it wasn't exactly 8-1, reporters at the time, the boston globe, as they reported the statistic that is true, parents were told -- much more voluble, and shrinking violence. exactly the opposite is true. the typical classroom, no one calls on them. it is true boys get more attention, more careful research, it was negative attention. boys are more unruly or the teacher will say the president of france, johnny is not listening, there are more reprimands but more positive engagement comment in fact fairly good data from the department of education that they feel they have a right to express their opinions and if the teacher wants to hear what they have to say and far fewer boys feel that way. >> host: that leads into your second book "the war against boys: how misguided policies are harming our young men". just updated this year. the new e
. and by the time i was engaging with the gender educators, i learned that you must always check the data. and i just couldn't find it. he did not appear that the research was anywhere that this factoid was documented. and it turned out that he had done a study for the department of education and it was lost somewhere in the department of education. later, she wasn't able to do it, the professor did a follow-up and he admitted that it wasn't exactly 81, it was less a matter something like that. but none of that, for some reason, the reporters of the time, including "the washington post", they reported this statistic as true. boys were treated much more respectfully and valuable and they assert themselves and girls are sort of lacking balance. that is exactly the opposite was true. a typical classroom, the boys are often sitting in the back to spring the known cause on them and it's true that they may get more attention in some cases, but more careful research shows that it's negative attention at times because boys are more unruly and so the teacher will say, who do you think is the president of
forces last month. bernard smith has more from cairo. >> former center of islamic education in egypt has been one of the focal points for people, students protesting the coup that deposed mohamed morsi back in september. there's fighting still ongoing despite the arrests, between students and security forces all day. in fact it seems to have stepped up over the past few days, protests pretty much all the time but yesterday we had a group of women students just outside the university beaten up by local residents and by security forces, we are told. earlier last month we had 21 students facing trial for previous protests at al assad university and we have another 12 students who have been jailed for 17 years for protesting again at that same university. so a considerable crack down by the security forces against the students and at al assad university and they are continuing to protest and they seem to be gathering in intensity. >> thailand will hold its parliamentary plekses o election january 2nd, after yin luck shinawatra has, run the country. wayne hay reports from bangkok. >> the lead
to take a part that have memorial. of course, mandela believed education was the foundation for a new south africa. but 37 years protesting in soweto, apartheid is proving hard to overcome. [ cheering ] >> nelson mandela supporting and encouraging children in school. from the start of his career as an anti-apartheid activist, he placed education is the the center of the struggle. his single priority was develop the nation's education. in 197, the soweto up rising began over being forced to learn afrikaans, the language of the oppressors. noone of the students who rioted now is principal of the school. >> wlater because of they were trying to educate us and we begin to understand why the situation, why the up rising. >> reporter: here the students learn as nelson mandela, to educate black students to the level of their white counter parts, to give them purpose. >> they have struggled to fulfill mandela's vision. schools outside cape town are more typical of the problems that the system is struggling with. activists argue there is now a dangerous gap between the promise of education and
the variety of views we had for instance when the heritage foundation -- heritage was about education reform and getting a lot of different conservatives together. they would fight like heck about the best way forward on education reform, the best way forward on tax reform. jack kempe would have horrible fights with phil gramm and others and then they would come together and come up with a tax reform plan. there were to be constant battles on the budget. there were a lot of different ways forward in the conservatives we believe even into the 90s, 1994 we always talked about a legislative laboratory of ideas and you talked about the place of ideas and we talked about the free marketplace of ideas. we would close the doors and go downstairs and debate nonstop among ourselves until we came up with the best plan for reform moving for it. just not the case anymore. if you veer off the path a little bit to the right or a little bit to the left there are ideological witch hunts and people suggesting you are insufficiently conservative and insufficiently republican. that is the 9% party. that's the
highlighting the fact that a lot of this job growth, good jobs, manufacturing, education, construction. so they say that those are signs that the economy is moving in the right direction. at the same time, as you point out, the white house looking at those numbers and using them to argue that unemployment insurance should be extended for 1.3 million americans. they point out that within those economic figures you can see 4 million americans have been unemployed for six months or more. here's what president obama had to say in his weekly address. take a listen. >> for many families it can be the difference between hardship and catastrophe. it makes a difference for a mother who suddenly doesn't know if she will be able to put food on the table for his kids or a father who lost his job and is looking for a new one. last year it ended 2.5 people out of poverty and cushioned the blow for many more. >> now, alex, republicans are making the opposite argument. they are saying that the low unemployment rate or relatively low unemployment rate speaks to the fact that the economy doesn't need more s
, south korea, japan and hong kong for its education secretary arne duncan says the solution should include higher academic standards, affordable college and retention of top-notch educators. >>mark: today, president obama will start a new push for the health-care.gov website. in an event at the white house he will highlight people he says have been held by his health or care reform law and website. the president also working on possible subsidies to insurance companies to let people keep their existing insurance plans as was originally promised. the government say most of the glitches on these website have now been fixed. and now that to the website is supposed to be running smoother, consumers are reporting mixed success as they try and lock on to the updated health care exchange. >>james: and man was killed in a shark attack while fishing from a kayak in hawaii. it happened but it off the island of maui. apparently, the fishermen speak for dangling over the edge of his kayak when a shark bit one of them. a friend kayaking near by tried to stop the man's bleeding with a tourniquet
into chronically short of the long run. that could hit the board of education communication will travel. all he could be due to low capital. we are all committed to the polls he could also provide the labor force has improved and international competitiveness which on economic development. its economy like it like more high technology industries. modern service industries. i could on thursday. at that time. more tellingly report to reply the un to bet that you publicly commit to demand the time and all. he was a newborn babies. the major force in promoting innovation multiple industry. we are at the coffee helped increase to govern tax revenues and financial income the entire population structure the next ten years. the teen population too bright. you increase the government expenditures on medical care to impose security. the honor because of the faulty increase in new born population. when they get to work the weekend to be more tax revenue which is a government financial pressures. however there also some worried about the new ball. the article post on twenty percent of business herald said
mandela and it will be tomorrow at f and b stadium in johannesburg and a belief that education was the only way for people to raise up from poverty and where that legacy stands today. and revolutionary cancer treatment and using one deadly disease to battle another. >> i'm mark and coming up, the afc race is heating up as manning is a leg up on the competition, that is ahead in sports. >>> wintry conditions will improve today but i'm tracking another round of snow for the northeast, i'll have details coming up. >>> al jazeera america continues and thomas and i are back with you in just 2 1/2 minutes. ♪ straight to the point. >> i'm on the ground every day finding stories that matter to you. >> in new orleans... >> seattle bureau... >> washington... >> detroit... >> chicago... >> nashville... >> los angeles... >> san francisco... >> al jazeera america, take a new look at news. >> from our headquarters in new york, here are the headlines this hour. >> al jazeera america is the only news channel that brings you live news at the top of every hour. >> a deal in the senate may be a
there are five things we can do to fix education in america >> the united states has education apartheid, that's the facts... >> talk to al jazeera with m. night shayamalan sunday at 7et / 4pt on al jazeera america >> welcome back, you're watching the news hour in al jazeera. a recap. demanding that the president resign. >>> lebanese government has sent in the army to take control of the northern city of tripoli. prime minister says they will remain there for the next six months. and thailand's prime minister has defended her government amid growing opposition on the street. hospital officials say two protestors were shot and wounded during latest confrontation with police. >>> now it's a multibillion industry that's never out of fashion. but it does have a dark side, tannery officials earn little more than $2 a day. as part of our two part investigation into the industry, rob reynolds went to meet some of the workers in a slum in dacca. >> of the dirty jobs bangladesh is t to survive, these tannery workers are day in and day out amid the rotting corpses of animals. mohamed says he's 14 but lo
at the time so deadly and the events that you actively reach out and outreach and education put them on as well as people while the kids and the ninety s that they haven't really thought about like the workshop. we had the first year that sense my workshop on the likely mentioned before people think about why they think of other you can get to it. terry and function of lights and we encourage them on by his lines as the creator he can and i kissed me and help in these light on a list along with the lead up to it. can they use like trying to distance of the building that goal is to break away of our pcs on the concept of the night and allow them to explore ok and talk about it the two workshops one of which is offered by new foundation is called dia. a liking to take it with chalk what's that you know all about you mentioned before that could be started. he actually began in japan yet so i'm there like a detective on programs was some good times didn't make a mean cocktail come back in nineteen ninety so the idea was to throw away the tax bucks home to see amy's all of the year on mor
. a low-cast accredited university that was named one of the most disruptive in education. "squawk" will be right back. [ male announcer ] they are a glowing example of what it means to be the best. and at this special time of year, they shine even brighter. come to the winter event and get the mercedes-benz you've always wished for, now for an exceptional price. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho, ho! [ male announcer ] lease the 2014 e350 for $579 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. a confident retirement. those dreams, there's just no way we're going to let them die. ♪ like they helped millions of others. by listening. planning. working one on one. that's what ameriprise financial does. that's what they can do with you. that's how ameriprise puts more within reach. ♪ >>> looks like yesterday's trading sort of. nothing happening. but you never know. and coming up, our higher learning series continues today with two men disrupting the world of online education. the ceo of university now and the president of ed x joins us after the break. i love having a free checked bag with my unit
the education secretary continues to look at this, and we will see what we can do. >> in my constituency, as in many others, small and medium- sized enterprises are the engine room of the economy, so why are business rates rising by an average of nearly £2,000 in this parliament? >> i can tell the hon. lady what we have done on business rates, which is to extend the freeze on business rates that the last government were going to get rid of. what we are also doing on business rates is to have a £2,000 cut in national insurance for every business in the country. for small businesses up and down our high streets, i cannot think of anything that will make a bigger difference than seeing their national insurance bill go down by £2,000 and being able to employ more people. on the subject of how to help business, how on earth can it be a good idea to say that you want to increase corporation tax as you go into the next parliament? that seems to me absolutely mad a new labour jobs tax. >> by the end of this year, more than 8,000 people in our country will have been diagnosed with pancreatic c
that poverty because she lacks a dicent education or health care or a community that views her future as their own, that should affect all of us. >> it should compel us to action. we are a better country. let me repeat. the combined trends of inceffed inequality pose a fundamental effect. >> republicans were quick to cit size of president's remarks. the income gap is caused by policies claiming that the affordable care act and tougher business regulations encourage company depends on the government. the statistics are telling. from 2009 to 2012 the average engine from the top 1% of earners increased 31%. incomes for the rest of the nation's workers rose by one half of one%. >> thousands of fast-food workers scheduled to last their ship are striking. in 100 cities they are striking, demanding pay. today's strikes are the latest move in a campaign that started last summer. the medium wage is slightly more than $900. >> the workers live in poverty, working in conditions. >> more than two and a quarter americans have non-management jobs with the top 10 fast food chains. anti-government fo
discusses education legislation passed this his state concerning teacher accountability, charter schools and changes to underperforming k-12 schools. governor malloy has called education the civil rights issue of our time, and he'll talk about his agenda at a forum of the american enterprise institute beginning at 1:30 p.m. eastern here on c-span2. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies this 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: and best selling author tom standage has a new book out, and it's called "writing on the wall." tom standage, what do cicero and twitter have in common? >> guest: well, the idea of the book is that social media is a very old idea. we think that it's recent and only people alive today have ever done it. but really what i'm arguing is there's a very long and rich tradition of social media that goes back to the era of cicero, so that's the first century b.c., and the point is that you don't need a digital network to do social media. if you have one, it goes faster, but you could actually do it in the old days. cicero
you the poster child for south africa's education. the mandela family was quoted describing you as the face of the new south africa. what is the face of the young generation of post-apartheid south africa. >> i think the young face of this new south africa is a dynamic face. we don't - our revolution will not be a political one. our revolution will be a revolution driven by innovation and prosperity across all income levels in south africa. we are very dynamic generation. my story is like that of millions of south africans. >> you describe this challenge rising to the challenge of innovation. what about domestically are there changes to that that young people face in south africa as they try to meet a global threshold to be competitive. >> certainly, which is why i believe my story resonates. a challenge is education. more south africans, world class education. the commitment to education, not just education, but achieving excellence. it's a challenge that i am sure my peers will adopt in the next couple of years. >> speaking of achieving educational excellence. is it true that
and schools were built so that now kids, including her son, can have an education. alex? >> that's a great story too. you've got so many from there, michelle. very quickly, the memorial tuesday, because of the enormity of that stadium in which it's going to be held s that the one that is being more focused upon and also given all the world leaders that are expected to attend, that over the funeral on sunday next week? >> reporter: it does require logistical planning. however, i will say the state funeral, which is going to be big, is in a remote village, his hometown. so people are going to have to get there. that's going to be a difficult process as well. that is expected to be huge because it's really going to be the last step in this mourning process. world leaders, some of them, we don't know exactly who yet, are expected to attend that as well. but all of this has had that sense of importance, this outpouring. just standing out here, you know, these beautiful, spontaneous songs will break out. the entire crowd joins in or just walking down a street. you walk by someone and they're jus
. if you look on a very macro , our education system is skills so thatr business can get the candidates they need from the u.k.. on a micro scale, business rates is just one of them. >> this is something you are very passionate about on a personal level. you put a proposal forward. what is the one thing you would do to change it? >> we are all about families, moms and kids and dads. we have a lot of women and a lot of part-time people, people with great skill to work coming back work 80 after having their children. it struck me that the two challenges with skills in our people,is those sort of and there are the young training people. you could have a scheme where you can get part-time work is back on the shoulder parts of that part-time work, getting those guys who haven't training to work, shadow and get some experience in a work environment. the employer gets to people covering one job. two people get training and the government gives them employment. a real society issue we have got is those million people. >> i am a person that is working for you. i have got kids, i am running aroun
education needs to be improved. whether you are going to get a lot of social media used as actually reading the attorney general's guidance, that's a separate question. but i think as part of the measure of art, education in schools as well, hopefully that will help to reduce the problems we have seen recently. >> that's fine for countries like england and whales, but of course, internationally, it's a separate problem, so the laws don't apply to anybody who is tweeting about a british case but from abooed, and it's very difficult to regulate that, isn't it? >> yes. >> particularly when there are different laws in different countries. >> yes, exactly. that is a major problem. it has an impact on high profile cases which would attract international interest. but there are those high-profile celebrities, politicians, companies, et cetera, and it's difficult, and you look at the position in the u.s., where, you know, prosecution for publication of -- of these sorts of comments for contempt of court is very, very limited and that is a massive problem, and i think one really interesting example
: the education system, the job system is not treating all americans equally. you see that in the minority numbers. some of the callers have talked about this. anyou're going into environment where you are the orst person of this race gender in that role, how much more difficult is it for you to break in as opposed to a workforce that is more diverse? host: you look at the overall but the number%, approaches numeral seven percent because of the increase in african-american unemployed and teenagers. correct? guest: that is part of the factors. you have much higher unemployment among minorities and younger people. you also look at it based on educational breakdowns. the unemployment rate is considerably higher among those who have not completed high school compared to those who have completed college. work isic morath's available online. thank you for being with us. coming up next, the vice president is back in the u.s. following a weeklong trip that included stops in china, south korea, and japan. we will have david lampton joining us from johns hopkins to discuss the state of relations between the
. you went to where. >> never mind. >> oh, my god tell me all these educated people on the set what is he trying to say. >> i went to alabama so i can probably explain it better than anybody else. boy that cuts like a knife. >> tell me, what is the concept. >> we don't know how to kick a field goal when we're at the 15 yard line. >> great game. >> is anyone here? >> kicked the ball -- 59 yard kick but we don't kick a 15 yard field goal. anyway, so let me just say there were a lot of people -- i'm going to say two things so you can't jump on me after i say the first thing. okay. >> okay. >> number one i hate to be harold ford everybody told us back in 1996 when we tried to pass welfare reform and limit the number of weeks, months, years people could be on welfare that we were the most cold hearted hateful people of all time and young children would starve and grand mothers would be thrown out in the snow. we were. we were called the most heartless people of all time. we passed it over two bill clinton wes to. he signed at any time third time. most everybody said that it was a great s
're not going to hurt the budgets of education because we are an education modulated government and of course health and welfare. these are the budgets that we are going to try to keep the way they are. we think there's some room for some cuts in the defense budget. not too much unfortunately. we live in a very shaky neighborhood it's very detailed. in this god is in the details. >> the federal reserve is now saying that this is over and that's causing a great deal of volatility in the markets. how will that impact the israeli market? >> first, foremost, 26, 27% of these exports are to the united states so this is immediate. it's a good thing that we have this separated. i mean, 26% to the united states, 30 something to europe and the rest to the far east and the rest of the world which means we are balancing the way that one area of the world is in trouble or collapsing or the second 2008 is happening, we are better protected against this, but the united states is the biggest sister. whatever happens there influences us. of course, we were following bernanke's policies and we, like the rest
now. >>> when it comes to our educating our students, the united states is falling behind again. the woman who turned around the dc school system knows how to fix it. michelle ree is up next. >>> martin bashir resigns after making disgusting comments about sarah palin. she's here to respond for the first time on tv. you'll see it only on "fox & friends" in about a half hour >>> the answer to the aflac trivia question, frankie muniz. the winner is jill from georgia. she'll get a copy of "george washington's secret six" which i will sign and we will send. >>> when it comes to educating our students, the united states is falling behind again. >> just take a look at the latest test results. we have american students, they didn't make the top five for reading, in fact, they fell to 17th overall. >> when it comes to science, we came in 21st. >> the worst of all, math, where american students ranked 26. >> right. so why do our students keep ahe? michelle ree is the founder of students first and former chancellor of dc's public schools. good morning to you. >> good morning. >> certainly
segregation, economic problems, educational problems that south africa needs to advance on in order to realize the society that nelson mandela had in mind for south africa. i got to tell you, being in south africa, the folks there, from all different colors, all different backgrounds, all different socio-economic levels, they're talking about these things and really feel like together they will be able to do so much more. >> abc's lana zak, thank you so much. >> the coverage of nelson mandela's life and death does not end here. see how his story influenced pop culture and moviemakers later in this half-hour. >>> another major headline this morning, the investigation into the shooting of an american teacher in libya. ronnie smith gunned down while jogging at a u.s. consulate in benghazi. his murder comes days after al qaeda called for libyan attacks on u.s. interests. smith's wife and son returned to the u.s. for the holidays. he was set to join them next week. >>> a wicked storm slamming the nation this morning is far from over. a treacherous mix of snow and sleet crippling the south central u
that money to invest in health care, build hospitals, improve education or help the homeless. i think it's embarrassing. >> reporter: tens of thousands of tickets have already been sold and nearly half a million fans are expected to come to the games. finishing the stadium is not only crucial for the city, but the entire country. >>> quick mention of the quicket. australia have taken control of the second test against england. the captain killing 148 centuries off of brad hatten. the aussies eventually declaring on 570 for 9. england in a lot of trouble in that match. >> andy many thanks. top stories and more reaction to the death of nelson mandela straight ahead here on al jazeera. see you again. ♪ >>> the sun will rise tomorrow, the next day, and the next. it may not appear as bright as yesterday, but life will carry on. >> archbishop desmund tutu articulating the loss of nelson mandela. across the world, people are mourning the loss of the former south african president. near his home many are celebrating the life of the man. there will be public remembrances for mandela next week.
. a lot of people bringing their children down because they want to educate about the man and the vital role that he played in this country's history. tis is the house where nelson mandela first lived with his first wife evelyn and their children. he stayed with his former wife winnie mandela and their two daughters. she stayed in the house for much of the 27 years that he was in prison, isolated, separated from each other. this is where the police came all the time, intimidating her, raiding the house and harassed her. she was the subject of banning orders and sent to live in a remote area in an effort to try to separate her from the party, from the a.n.c. her and the family devastated by the loss of their beloved family member, close family member for them, but somebody millions of south africans and around the world feel they know personally as well. >> tania paige in south africa. thank you. lots more on the website. it's words a visit - aljazeera.com/mandela. watch a documentary featuring stories of people who knew nelson mandela. aljazeera.com/mandela. >> most of the attackers who
to a preschool? >> the secretary of education is here and i'm sure he will want to write you on that specific case. one of the things this government has done is remove the dead hand of bureaucracy and theralization to make sure teachers can't teach the way they do best in the classroom and the parents have a greater role in the running of our schools. >> with a reference back to a decent question from the honorable gentleman, perhaps not on this issue, with the deputy prime minister agree that, for the coalition's concern on europe, actions actually speak louder than words? would he agree that the chancellor's decision sometime back to assist the irish economy , the very responsible conduct of the internal unity government to review, and the prime in china, own words he wants to recommend we stay in. this is a great boost of confidence for people like him and me, down to life liberal democrat and pro-european. joy to hearays a the mischievous wit and wisdom of my right honorable friend. as he knows, we are as one on the european issue. we need to reform the european union. you need to strip
the really ugly, ugly colors. how did we get back to adult colors? >> people are so much more educated now. much more information available. just on the pantone website alone when we put up the colors of the season, we get so many hits. there are so many consumers today who are so much smarter than that used to be and they have the world wide range of what color is available to them, and they are making smarter choices. >> window apparel companies and football -- footwear companies rely on the colors and there is a lot at stake but what about businesses that engage in other businesses, industrial companies, what do they get from colors of the year? >> of course, from a consumer standpoint, if you know the color of the year and they put it out there in a concept car or coffeemakers, you are going to be able to see the color and it is going to register in your mind so you are going to be looking for the color. being more selective. >> enough of the purple. let's get back to our real set design. "surveillance" graphic. our director uses pantone to get the colors on our set. that joanrk city s
and use different technology for specific purpos purposes. some educators warn that nurseries are falling into the trap of displacing traditional learning and play activities with high tech alternatives. the challenge for daycare centers now is trying to combine both. making children as comfortable with the mouse as they are with the pencil. >> rescue operation under way to reach migrants trapped on a fi fishing boat off the coast of southern italy. the shows the ship struggling in gale force winds. >>> a fire running through a garment factory killing seven people. it happened in a loft where workers were sleeping in a dorm tore. many people work in unsafe continues. the wreckage of a police helicopter which crashed into a crowded glasgow pub in scotland is being removed. investigators say the pilot did not make any emergency calls before the crash. nine people were killed, but there could be more bodies buried inside the building. >>> french police say they've broken up a huge arm smuggling ring. let's get more from jackie who has been following the story. jackie, it sounds like it was q
's name means western education is forbidden. it sames to throw -- overthrow the government and to -- establish an islamic estate. one of their worst attacks came two years ago when a series of bombs targeted churches on christmas day. >>> hakeem josef is in scotland and says that the attack shows that the nigerian security forces are ineffective. >> there are the police, there is the security services. we have more than four security agencies in in nigeria. it is then extremely strange that a couple of -- hundreds of people could launch an early-morning attack in such a situation. it shows that the activities of the government is not being lead by intelligence, which is very key in situations of insecurity as [ inaudible ] by the boca haram crisis. what has been happening is when there is an attack by boca haram the government launches a counterattack usually on the civilian population. amnesty international highlighted this. nigeria's body for security in the -- during the military era, until -- even more so continuing during a civil democratic regime ostensibly has only g
've been really, really happy with our education, but i feel like they just kind of leave it out because it's ssrt of like opinionated and they don't like to teach opinions in school. >> you have to be a proud dad with this book? >> i am. her stories just drive the book. what better way to connect with students than stories written by a 13-year-old. so we are really excited. as lauren said, her schools have done such a great job. they've educated her so well she was able to write most of the book at age 13. but we wanted to give the schools and parents another tool in the toolbox to help them to teach the american dream, which is part of what capitalism is all about. >> if you had to, in a nutshell, the elements discussed here and creatively brought out through the characters, what are they? you say this is capitalism. what are the points? >> lauren, you want to take a couple? >> jobs, hope, community, charity, honesty, morals. >> they're all in here. >> they all kind of tie together and form capitalism. >> we want to find a unique way to reach kids. kids are not interested in republican or
more than 100,000 cubic feet of stuff a year into educational materials. the finished products and raw materials are then made available to 8,000 teacher members serving more than 600,000 students in the south bay and peninsula. it's as big as mare thought it would be. because she knew all along these were things students would love, and that would inspire their teachers. >> there's nothing more powerful to a teacher than see the kids respond. >> after 20 years, she's stepping down this spring. she says after so many years, she's looking to life as someone other than mary, looking it turns out to be reborn a bit herself. >> now we're thinking about anthony slaughter and the really cold weather. let's find out when it's going to warm up. >> if only we could fast forward to, like, march. >> there you go. our winter is really from about now to the middle part of february. so we're in the part of, at least the time of year, i couldn't say winter because winter actually hasn't started, but it's hard to believe with the freeze warnings we've been dealing with all week long. and the last day
school and the arsenal of weapons used in the massacre. in addition to the young children, six educators were killed when adam lanza went on his deadly rampage. newtown school superintendent is warning parents to limit their media exposure. he says these calls could be an emotional trigger. the anniversary of the shooting is december 14th. john, diana? >> thank you. >>> a 14-year-old boy in massachusetts is pleading not guilty to murdering his math teacher. phillip chism is accused in the october death of 24-year-old colleen ritzer. he had pleaded not guilty in a lower court but had to do so again yesterday because his case had been moved to massachusetts superior court. chism is being held without bail. >>> a man charged with killing a tsa agent in los angeles international airport last month is facing justice. the courtroom sketch shows the bandages on his neck. three people were wounded. he faces the death penalty if convicted. >>> new court documents show toronto mayor ford may have tried to buy a video that appears to show him smoking crack. the documents suggest that ford may have
for foreigners, any westerners, to be inside benghazi? any idea, he must be committed to education. why was they that area? why did he teach that the school? what was behind his mission, if you will? >> reporter: it's hard to know with clarity at the moment. what we do know, reports coming from students, that are coming from the principal there, saying that he was a very, very sweet man, students there posting on social media saying that he was dedicated to them, that he made a difference to only bright light in everything happening to them in benghazi, he appears to be a man very dedicated to helping young libyans aspire to their dreams. >> nic, thanks for that. nic robertson, reporting for us from new york. somebody who spent a bit of time in libya. just seems odd to be in public in benghazi given what's happened there. >> unfortunate story for the situation there. >>> of course the pope making more news. >> every day. >> setting to fight child sex abuse in the catholic church head onnen assembling a pan toll advise him on protecting children frpedophile. >> this is after the pope met
, under educated and many uneducated in that 18 to 35 age group. >> reporter: thanks s great te you. >> david gregory making a rare sunday appearance in new york hosting meet the press this morning from new york. we have been hearing further plans from president obama, former president clinton and carter. what will the role be at the events? >> to be there to pay tribute and give it the sense of moment that it deserves. and i think for all of them at different levels, president bush who i covered did not have the closest relationship with mandela but respected him. president obama in a unique way encouraged to go see him when he is still a senator. mandela encouraged to meet with up and coming star in politics. for our president to be so moved by mandela, to really have his own place in a civil rights struggle against apartheid. >> when it comes to president obama's presence on the international stage this potential for comprehensive agreement with iran yesterday. it could be worse. when it comes to the international stage how is his capital? >> i don't think it is exceedingly high.
. those who say a demonstration should be concerned with education rather than theater don't understand either and will never organize a successful demonstration. or, for that matter, a successful revolution. publicity includes everything from buttons and leaflets to press conferences. be in touch with the best artist you can locate to design the visual props. posters can be silk screened very cheeply, and -- cheaply, and people can be taught to do it in a short time. buttons have to be purchased. the cheapest are those printed directly on the metal. the paint rubs off after a while, but they're ideal for mass gone straights. you can print 10,000 for about $250. leaflets, like posters, should be well designed. one way of getting publicity is to negotiate with the city for permission. again, this raises political questions about talking to the pigs, but there's no doubt one reason for engaging in permit discussions, publicity. the date, time and place of the to demonstration all have to be chosen with skill. know the projected weather reports. pick a time and day of the week that are con
. in november, many were good-paying jobs. 40,000 in education and health care, 27,000 manufacturing jobs added. 17,000 construction jobs. >> now we're getting consistent job reports that are plus 200,000. that's very positive not only for the economy but it should be positive for people should start to feel generally better. that conditions are in fact improving. >> on closer look, the unemployment rate for adult men is at 6.7%. for women, 6.2%. but the numbers are higher for african-americans and teenagers. still, some worry washington's upcoming budget battles could threaten the recovery. >> it's quite clear that the u.s. economy pays attention to what washington is doing. but this is an unpredictable business. makes it interesting, but it makes it hard to know sort of what the washington does in the next week, month, or year. what that means for sort of how much the economy can recover and at what rate. >> while there might be political uncertainty, for the time being, there is only good news for those like recent college grad eddie christian who just landed his first job. >> i look at this
. by educating the public. >> next up we'll listen to president ford himself announcing the result of her surgery. >> i justice returned from the hospital, where i saw betty, as she came from the operating room. the doctor has assured me that she came through the operation all right. [applause] [applause] it's been a difficult 36 hours. our faith will sustain us, and betty would expect me to be here. >> in a few weeks, i will complete my chemotherapy treatments. and that will be another milestone for me. since that first year, i have not talked much about the differences in my experience with cancer. but at that time, my mas sect my and the discussion about it -- i was really pleased to see it because it prompted a large number of women to go and get checkups in their local communities. it made my recoup ration easier because i new that i was helping others. i make this progress report to help cheer up those who have just had an operation for cancer, and to encourage them to keep up their good spirits. part of the battle against cancer is to fight the fear that accompanies the disease. >> and of
using education apps but they fear parents will use it as a babysitter. fisher price says parent dos have the option of using the product without the ipad. is is the same thing people say about movies. my nieces, if they wch nemo one more time. that's the debate. >> but i bet your nieces aren't strapped in. >> wn it's right here. >> that baby has no choice. >> but if youe putting educational things on it. >> it'still e habit of having the visual right re and not engaging or reading a book. >> are we not embracing technology? none of us still use the brick cell phone. >> your baby starts ordering stuff from amazon. >> i d't know. i don't know. >> speaking ofipads, president obama has o but there's another amevice he is not even allowed to use. >> am not allowed for security reasons to have an iphone. i have noticed thatsash aa an and meliapend a lot of time on it. >> the president is a famously loyal customer. >> so why does the leader of the free wor carry around a device from 2007? because the super secure blackberry is extremely difficult to hack into. the president also said that
and others about the application of the rule as a part of trying to educate all of the people that are affected and we have brought medicare advantage expert into those to help answer those questions. >> just to follow up on that, medpac looked at as a couple years ago about an observation, and because of the increase in observation, which they had found committee also looked at whether the recovery audit contractors, medicare recovery audit contractors scrutiny seemed to be driving this allowed. and they looked at a broader segment, both medicare and private observation stays. and they found that there was an increase in observation across the board him and not just from the medicare and they surmised that there were private payers also scrutinizing short stays in the same way that medicare was and that that might be driving it. we just note that in the report i think we did look at whether or not i'm the message we lookt medicare beneficiaries both able and disabled we looked at whether the increase in utilization was different for people over 65 and under 65, and admittedl
of the last four months. in november, many were good paying jobs. 40,000 in education and health care. 27,000 manufacturing jobs added. 17,000 construction jobs. >> now we are getting consistent job reports plus 200 and that is positive and positive not only for the economy but it should be forpositive for people should start to feel generally better that conditions are, in fact, improving. >> reporter: on closer look, the unemployment rate for adult men at 6.7%. for women, 6.2%. but the numbers are higher for african-americans and teenagers but they -- >> it's quite clear the u.s. economy pays attention to what washington is doing but this is an unpredictable business and makes it interesting but it makes it hard to know sort of what washington does in the next week, months, or year. what that means for sort of how much the economy can recover and at what rate. >> reporter: while there may be political uncertainty, for the time being, there is only good news for those like recent college grad eddie christian who just landed his first job. >> i look at this as sort of a career, not just a
of education out of them and it lasts well beyond the holidays. >> star wars titles are huge this year, right? >> star wars has always been a great seller for us and they're a huge hit and lego is a big deal. we're thrilled that this year we're finding a lot of sales through this book right here the animal book. >> what do you like about that book? >> how you can do a lot of your favorite animals. >> what's your favorite animal? >> peacock. >> very fitting. a good one. >> so spontaneous. >> we appreciate it. this is the 6th year in a row. >> 6th or 7th? >> actually it's the 13th year. >> that's close. >> $1.4 million. >> that's amazing. thank you so much. we appreciate it. happy holidays to [ female announcer ] i like to mix things up a bit with grands mini pot pies. only four ingredients. and a few easy steps. weeknight dinner in a flash. and my family devours them. pillsbury grands biscuits. make dinner pop. guys... [ female announcer ] pillsbury cinnamon rolls, with cinnabon cinnamon, are an irresistible sunday morning idea. nothing calls them to the table faster. make breakfast pop! >>> g
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